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Peter Giddings Racing

1955 Aston Martin DB3S - Chassis #DB3S/117

The Aston Martin DB3s was a hugely successful British sports racing car of the 1950s. The car was designed by A.G. "Willie" Watson, who also designed its twin-cam six cylinder engine. The DB3S used a large-diameter tube chassis with torsion bar suspension and a traditional de Dion axle located by a central slide. The 2922 cc (83 mm bore and 90 mm stroke) engine produced about 225 bhp at 5500 rpm and drove through a four-speed gearbox. The wheelbase was a trim 87 inches, with track front and rear of 49 inches. Overall weight was about 1900 pounds. The result was a top speed of over 140 mph. The chassis was clothed with very stunning coachwork, designed by Aston Martin's Frank Feeley.

From 1953 to 1957, just 31 of these beautiful sports racing cars were built, including 11 that were factory works-run racers. The DB3Ss took Aston Martin to many international victories, including wins at Silverstone and second place finishes at Le Mans in both 1955 (Peter Collins & Paul Frere) and 1956 (Stirling Moss & Peter Collins).

Aston Martin DB3S/117 was campaigned by California's George Newell for a number of years prior to being acquired by Peter.

DB3S working hard

 

 

The Aston Martin DB3S working hard in Peter's hands. Seattle International Raceway. Photo by Bob Dunsmore.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seattle 1997

 

 

Peter at speed in the Aston Martin DB3S, coming off the sweeping Turn 8 at Seattle International Raceway, 1997. Photo by Mike Sims.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aston and Healey

 

 

 

Peter pushes the Aston Martin DB3s hard, holding off a very fast Austin Healey. Photo by Bob Dunsmore.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aston DB3S

 

 

Peter in Aston Martin DB3S #117. "A stunning looking and handling car," says Peter, "but 500 pounds too heavy and 50 bhp short!" Bob Dunsmore photo.